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NEWS

March 25, 2012

Clan Currie to Participate in Annual Battle of Culloden

Commemoration Service

Alan Currie, Convener of the Clan Currie Society for Scotland, will represent Clan Currie at the Annual Service of Commemoration for the Battle of Culloden. The event will be held on Saturday, April 14, 2012 at 11:00 AM. The service, to be held at the Culloden Memorial Cairn, has been conducted annually since 1925 by The Gaelic Society of Inverness.

The program will be conducted in Scots Gaelic as well as English. As part of the service, Currie will lay a wreath on behalf of the Clan at the cairn erected to memorialize the battle and all that died that day.

"Many MacMhuirich/Currie’s participated in the battle", explains Alan Currie. "Iain MacMhuirich, a member of Clan Currie was one of many Highlanders that fought and died on Drumossie Moor (the original name for the battlefield) alongside the MacDonalds of Clanranald and other clans."

The inscription on the 20 feet high cairn reads:

"THE BATTLE OF CULLODEN WAS FOUGHT ON THIS MOOR 16TH APRIL 1746. THE GRAVES OF THE GALLANT HIGHLANDERS WHO FOUGHT FOR SCOTLAND & PRINCE CHARLIE ARE MARKED BY THE NAMES OF THEIR CLANS."

The Battle of Culloden took place on 16 April 1746 between the Jacobite supporters of Prince Charles Edward Stuart and the army of the Hanoverian King George II. It was the culmination of a civil war fought over religious and political beliefs which divided both clan and country. Discontent with the rule of the Catholic King James VII of Scotland & II of England led to William of Orange being invited to contest the throne in 1688 prompting James to flee to France. The Jacobite rebellion of 1745-6 (known as 'the Forty-Five') was the last of several unsuccessful attempts to restore the Stuart dynasty to the monarchy.

The Jacobite Standard was raised on 19 August 1745 at Glenfinnan with Charles Edward proclaimed as Regent and his father as King James VIII and III. His army marched towards London but received less support in England that had been expected. A decision was taken to return to the Highlands. An army commanded by William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland and youngest son of George II, pursued them. The two armies met on Drumossie Moor.

The Jacobites were outnumbered, poorly equipped and lacking in firepower, munitions and cavalry. They had marched all the previous night on an abortive foray and they were hungry (their food supplies having been left in Inverness). In addition, the battleground suited Cumberland's cavalry and canon and was wholly unsuitable for the Jacobites' most effective tactic - the charge. The Jacobites were routed in less than an hour.